not-a-comedian:

12exe:

Horton hears somebody he used to know

image

do you ever regret drawing something

(via ringokilledthepropman)


artdetails:

Tughra (Official Signature) of Sultan Suleiman. Istanbul, Turkey. c. 1555-1560. Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper.

(via hellobiba)


vivelafrance24601:

You know when you try to draw hands and you finally get the shape right but then you look end result and justimage

(via mabelsguidetolife)


sarahj-art:

Happy Batman Day!

(via tastefullyoffensive)


friend who lives hundreds of miles away: i made food
me: can i have some

z-eniith:

this happened

z-eniith:

this happened

(via mimsically)


2headedsnake:

Vincent van Gogh
'Wheat Field in the Rain', 1889

2headedsnake:

Vincent van Gogh

'Wheat Field in the Rain', 1889


dzolamboto:

oregonfairy:


The tallest statue in the world, Ushiku Daibutsu.

this always gives me chills


Insane.

dzolamboto:

oregonfairy:

The tallest statue in the world, Ushiku Daibutsu.

this always gives me chills

Insane.

(via crisanonymous)


annmariexrose:

Single and ready to get nervous around anyone I find attractive.

(via ringokilledthepropman)


asylum-art:

 Sophie Kahn Sculptures

Sophie Kahn’s work addresses the resonances of death in the still image. It owes its fragmented aesthetic to the interaction of new and old media, and the collision of the body with imaging technology.

I combine cutting-edge means of reproduction, like 3d laser scanning and 3d printing, with ancient bronze casting techniques. Using damaged 3d data, I create sculptures and video works that resemble de-constructed monuments or memorials.

The precise 3d scanning technology I use was never designed to capture the body, which is always in motion. When confronted with a moving body, it receives conflicting spatial coordinates, generating a 3d ‘motion blur’. From these scans, I create videos or life-sized 3d printed mold sculptures. The resulting sculptures bear the artifacts of all the digital processes they have been though. The scanning and 3d printing process strips color and movement from the body, leaving behind only traces of its form – a scan of the face resembles nothing more than a digital death mask.

(via narabean)